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Managing Groups

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This chapter is from the book

Objectives

This chapter covers the following Microsoft-specified objectives for the "Managing Users, Computers, and Groups" section of the Managing and Maintaining a Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Environment exam:

Create and manage groups

  • Create and modify groups by using the Active Directory Users and Computers console.
  • Identify and modify the scope of a group.
  • Manage group membership.
  • Find domain groups in which a user is a member.
  • Create and modify groups by using automation.
  • For simplicity of network administration, we can create group objects and allocate resource access rights to these objects. Then by making user accounts members of the group, we can grant them the access that the group objects have been assigned.

Outline

Introduction

126

Creating and Managing Groups

126

The Four Domain Functional Levels

127

The Three Forest Functional Levels

128

Group Type

129

Group Scope

129

Domain Local Groups

131

Global Groups

132

Universal Groups

132

Recommended Sequence of Groups

133

Default Groups

134

Default Groups on Member Servers

134

Default Groups in Active Directory

136

System Groups

137

Creating and Modifying Groups by Using the Active Directory Users and Computers Console

138

Identifying and Modifying the Scope of a Group

142

Managing Group Membership

144

Adding Accounts to Groups with Command-Line Tools

146

Finding Domain Groups in Which a User Is a Member

148

Creating and Modifying Groups by Using Automation

149

Assigning Groups

151

Chapter Summary

153

Key Terms

153

Apply Your Knowledge

153

Study Strategies

  • In studying this section, be sure to practice all the activities described. Become very familiar with Active Directory Users and Computers and creating groups.
  • Examine the use of the default groups. Know their capabilities and limitations.
  • You will need access to a Windows Server 2003 domain controller. Many of the tools are new, or they differ from those available in Windows 2000, so don't try to get by with a Windows 2000 domain controller.
  • Memorize the AGDLP acronym and what it means. It is a best practice that will serve you well, both on the exam and on the job.

Introduction

This chapter continues your study of some of the common daily duties of a Windows Server 2003 administrator. You can rest assured that you will perform the tasks you learn in this chapter very often. This chapter discusses creating and managing group accounts, including what type of group to use for particular situations. An especially important topic is group scope, as well as how it is affected by domain functional level. We'll be starting with creating and managing groups. Let's get to it!

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