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This chapter is from the book

This chapter is from the book

Debt and Spending

Your attitude toward debt and spending can also create financial conflict. Certainly in the United States, debt is considered a natural byproduct of spending. This attitude is quickly becoming the norm in other cultures, too.

In addition, we have a habit of turning wants into needs. This was emphasized in my house recently.

Several years ago, we left a home with a pool for a less expensive and pool-less home in another state. Our decision fell in line with the "trade pay for opportunity" mindset that I advocate. I was leaving a corporate environment to pursue additional writing and speaking opportunities, taking on consulting projects as needed.

Recently, we decided to move closer to our children's school. In the ensuing search, my wife saw a house with a nice patio and pool. Soon after, she had added a pool into the requirements for every home we looked at.

When asked about this, she made the case that we "needed" a pool so that our kids' friends had something fun to do when they came over. She also said that our dogs could use the pool to cool off.

Although my wife had not stated that the pool was an actual live-or-die need, by including it in our home requirements, she had made it a de-facto need.

Once again, I am not advocating a lifestyle in which you enjoy no leisure activities or material comforts. That's not the point.

I only want you to evaluate your motivations and attitudes toward money to ensure that they don't become career stumbling blocks.

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