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Managing Groups

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This chapter is from the book

Apply Your Knowledge

Exercises

3.1 Creating users and groups

In this exercise we will create three groups and add members to them. Then we will make the three groups members of a universal group. Because there aren't many groups to work with, we'll use Active Directory Users and Computers.

Estimated Time: 5 minutes

  1. Open Active Directory Users and Computers and navigate to the LanStudents OU.
  2. Create a global security group object called AdminStudents. Add the user accounts for those users whose title is Network Administrator to the member list of the group.
  3. Create a global security group object called AnalystStudents. Add the user accounts for those users whose title is Systems Analyst to the member list of the group.
  4. Create a global security group object called TrainerStudents. Add the user accounts for those users whose title is Trainer to the member list of the group.
  5. Create a universal security group object called AllStudents. Add the three group accounts we just created to the member list of the group.

Exam Questions

  1. You want to create a user account for Joan Myles using a command from the command prompt. The account is to be a member of the Engineers group in the KansasCity container, disabled when created, have Secur1ty as its password, and be placed in the "ou=Users,ou=KansasCity,DC=70-290,DC=int" container. Which of the following tools or combination of tools can do the job?

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    A.

    Net User followed by dsmove

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    B.

    ldifde followed by dsmod

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    C.

    dsadd

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    D.

    csvde followed by dsmove

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    E.

    dsquery followed by dsmod

  2. You are the junior administrator for a large engineering firm with several locations. You read in a magazine that the best way to assign resources in a multidomain environment is to assign permissions to a domain local group, then add the Global groups to the domain local group, and then add the Global groups to a Universal group. However, the server won't let you create a Universal group. What is the most likely problem?

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    A.

    You don't have the proper authority.

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    B.

    The domain functional level is at Windows 2000 mixed.

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    C.

    The domain functional level is at Windows 2000 native.

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    D.

    The domain functional level is not at Windows 2003 native.

  3. You are planning for resource access in a multidomain forest. Some users from all domains will need access to three continental headquarters domains. What is the recommended strategy for providing access to these resources?

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    A.

    Users → universal groups → global groups → domain local groups → permissions to resources

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    B.

    Users → global groups → universal groups → domain local groups → permissions to resources

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    C.

    Users → domain local groups → universal groups → global groups → permissions to resources

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    D.

    Users → universal groups → permissions to resources

  4. You are the network administrator for JJamis Inc. The network consists of a single Active Directory domain named jjamis.com. The functional level of the domain is Windows 2000 native. Some network servers run Windows 2000 Server, and others run Windows Server 2003. All users in your accounting department are members of an existing global distribution group named G-Acct. You create a new network share for the accounting users. You need to enable the members of G-Acct to access the file share. What should you do?

    bullet.gif

    A.

    Raise the functional level of the domain to Windows Server 2003.

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    B.

    Change the group type of G-Acct to security.

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    C.

    Change the group scope of G-Acct to universal.

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    D.

    Raise the functional level of the forest to Windows Server 2003.

  5. You are the network administrator for JJamis Inc. The network consists of two Active Directory domains. The functional level of both of the domains is Windows 2000 mixed. Some domain controllers run Windows 2000 Server, and others run Windows Server 2003. You are trying to create a Universal group to allow you to share a printer between the two domains, but when you try to create a group, the option to create it as a Universal group is grayed out. What should you do?

    bullet.gif

    A.

    Raise the functional level of the domain to Windows Server 2003.

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    B.

    Assign permissions for the printer to a domain local group. Create a global group in each domain. Add the desired users to the global group in each domain. Add both global groups to the domain local group.

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    C.

    Create a global group in each domain. Add the desired users to the global group in each domain. Assign permissions for the printer to a global group. Add both user global groups to the printer global group.

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    D.

    Raise the functional level of the forest to Windows Server 2003.

  6. You are the network administrator for JJamis Inc. The network consists of a single Active Directory domain named jjamis.com. The functional level of the domain is Windows 2000 mixed. Some domain controllers run Windows 2000 Server, and others run Windows Server 2003. All users in your accounting department are members of an existing global distribution group named G-Acct. You create a new network share for the accounting users. You need to enable the members of G-Acct to access the file share. What should you do?

    bullet.gif

    A.

    Raise the functional level of the domain to Windows Server 2003.

    bullet.gif

    B.

    Change the group type of G-Acct to security.

    bullet.gif

    C.

    Change the group type of G-Acct to universal.

    bullet.gif

    D.

    Raise the functional level of the forest to Windows Server 2003.

    bullet.gif

    E.

    None of the above.

  7. You are the network administrator for LS Inc. The network consists of a single Active Directory domain named lsinc.com. The functional level of the domain is Windows 2000 native. You're getting ready to go to an offsite meeting, but you need to create 20 accounts for new users that are starting tomorrow morning. Your secretary is willing to enter the new accounts for you, but she has only domain user access. What should you do? Choose the best answer.

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    A.

    Add her to the Domain Administrators group and have her create the user accounts.

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    B.

    Add her to the Domain Admins group and have her create the user accounts.

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    C.

    Add her to the Account Operators group and have her create the user accounts.

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    D.

    Add her to the Power Users group and have her create the user accounts.

  8. You are the network administrator for LS Inc. The network consists of a single Active Directory domain named lsinc.com. The functional level of the domain is Windows 2000 native. You're in an offsite meeting, and you get a call from your secretary. The new system administrator started today. She created his account, he can log on, but he still can't access some domain resources. You gave her the permissions listed in the last question, and she successfully created his account. What is the problem? Choose the best answer.

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    A.

    Have her add his account to the Domain Administrators group.

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    B.

    Have her add his account to the Domain Admins group.

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    C.

    Have her add his account to the Account Operators group.

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    D.

    Have her add his account to the Power Users group.

    bullet.gif

    E.

    None of the above.

Answers to Exam Questions

  1. B, C. ldifde (with the appropriate data file as input) followed by dsmod (to change the password) does the job, as does dsadd by itself. Net User cannot create a group membership. csvde cannot create group memberships, and dsmove is unnecessary because csvde can create the user account in any container. dsquery cannot create a user account. See "Adding Accounts to Groups with Command-Line Tools."
  2. B. Universal groups are available only at the Windows 2000 native and Windows Server 2003 functional levels. The Windows 2000 mixed and Windows Server 2003 interim levels are used to support Windows NT 4.0 domain controllers, so Global group nesting and Universal groups cannot be used. See "The Four Domain Functional Levels."
  3. B. This is the recommended method for providing access to resources through group membership. See "Recommended Sequence of Groups."
  4. B. Changing the group type to security is the only correct answer. Distribution groups cannot be used to assign permissions. Because this is a single domain environment, a universal group is not necessary. Changing the functional level by itself will not accomplish anything. See "Group Type."
  5. B. The only correct answer is B. You can't nest global groups in Windows 2000 mixed mode. You still have Windows 2000 domain controllers, so you can't enable either Windows Server 2003 domain or Windows Server 2003 Forest functional levels. See "The Four Domain Functional Levels," "The Three Forest Functional Levels," and "Group Scope."
  6. E. Distribution groups cannot be used to assign permissions. Unfortunately in Windows 2000 Mixed mode, you cannot convert a distribution group to a security group of any kind, domain local, global or universal. Because we still have Windows 2000 domain controllers, we can't change the forest or the domain functional level to Windows Server 2003. The only solution would be to change the domain functional level to Windows 2000 native, but because it's not listed, there is no good answer listed. See "The Four Domain Functional Levels," "The Three Forest Functional Levels," and "Group Scope."
  7. C. There is not a Domain Administrators group, and the Power Users group is a local group. Adding a user to the Domain Admins group, even temporarily, is not a good idea because it gives them access to everything in the domain. The Account Operators group will allow your secretary to create and edit accounts without opening up too many resources on your domain. See "Default Groups."
  8. E. There is not a Domain Administrators group, and the Power Users group is a local group. It is assumed from the previous question that the secretary was added to the Account Operators group. The Account Operators group cannot add or remove users from the Domain Admins group, so the only relevant answer is E. See "Default Groups."

Suggested Readings and Resources

  1. Boswell, William. Inside Windows Server 2003. New Riders, 2003. ISBN 0735711585.
  2. For information about LDAP, see RFCs 2251–2256. For information on LDIF, see RFC 2849.
  3. Matthews, Marty. Windows Server 2003: A Beginners Guide. McGraw-Hill, 2003. ISBN 0072193093.
  4. Minasi, Mark, et al. Mark Minasi's Windows XP and Server 2003 Resource Kit. Sybex, 2003. ISBN 0782140807.
  5. Minasi, Mark, et al. Mastering Windows Server 2003. Sybex, 2003. ISBN 0782141307.
  6. Shapiro, Jeffrey, et al. Windows Server 2003 Bible. John Wiley & Sons, 2006. ISBN 0764549375.
  7. Windows Server 2003 Deployment Guide. Microsoft Corporation.
  8. Windows Server 2003 Resource Kit. Microsoft Corporation.
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